Transformers Wheelie
Transformers Wheelie
Transformers Wheelie
Transformers Wheelie

The diminutive Wheelie introduced me to a genuinely new situation - actually wanting to own a Legends figure. You see, I tend to prefer to get figures in something approaching correct scale where possible. Obviously for the likes of Bonecrusher and Blackout you have to settle for what's put out while bitterly complaining on forums at the lack of Leader class figures for most onscreen Decepticons... but sometimes things work out. For those of you who've got this far and don't know Wheelie actually transformed into a remote control truck rather than a real vehicle, with his robot form being around three foot tall.

The toy was made in Deluxe size, and looks decent enough even if it's a bit too cutesy in the head design. However, I was after the Legends toy because it's closer in scale to the rest of my figures - even then, it's probably twice the size it should be, but there we go.


So Wheelie turns into a radio-control 4x4. Obviously at this scale it's hard to come up with anything to make it look like a radio-control toy; displayed along with other Legends the opaque windows and low-grade detailing just make Wheelie look like any other figure from that size class. However, displayed next to Deluxes and Voyagers the effect is more prominent. Detailing is pretty good - the tyres are nicely done while the bumpers on the front are moulded and highlighted with silver paint.

It would have been nice if the wheel hubs had been painted but then many Revenge of the Fallen figures have been sparse when it comes to applications. The only real problem with an otherwise cute little vehicle is that no attempt has been made to Wheelie's face where the rear window would have been, while the back of the truck is very obviously the robot chest - complete with Autobot symbol (the previous sentence does contain a spoiler if you still haven't seen the film, by the way). But then this is the Legends assortment that gave us the Jazz with an additional bumper on the car roof and the Ironhide with his arms stowed in the pickup bed, so you come to expect this sort of thing.


The transformation is straightforward, again as you might expect for a toy of this size. The resulting robot is surprisingly close to the CG model, though. The limbs are greatly simplified but at least the compromises made to the 4x4 mode mean there's a good head (much more accurate as it happens than that on the Deluxe) and torso there. The shape also captures the weedy, pathetic nature of the world's least devoted Decepticon.

He looks better from the front, it must be said. Sideways-on there is a big blue tray protruding out of Wheelie's back. The feet are undeniably a bit clumsy too - shame the two halves of the truck bonnet could' fold in a little bit more, as walking poses tend to make him look like he's wearing mad backwards clown shoes. Articulation is limited to the neck (which can peck forward), the hips and the elbows - the arms are actually quite limited due to the big wheels on the shoulders. The general use of dark grey plastic on the limbs isn't especially nice either - they blend with the wheels too much and don't have much contrast with the dark blue used for the main body. Silver would have been much nicer but again the budget constraints have won out. Wheelie's still rather good fun despite these limitations.


Considering the simplification needed to dumb any figure down to a viable Legends toy, Wheelie didn't disappoint. The design team wisely seem to have basically ignored the layout of the Deluxe in order to give Wheelie two fairly decent modes and the end result is good enough. For scale enthusiasts like myself he doesn't look out of place with much larger toys,and is probably one of the better Legends figures even without this qualification. The Deluxe certainly seems to be better designed and better engineered, but those after a figure more in keeping with Wheelie's film presence this one is a solid, if unspectacular, addition.