Transformers Skids and Mudflap
Transformers Skids and Mudflap
Transformers Skids and Mudflap
Transformers Skids and Mudflap
Transformers Skids and Mudflap
Transformers Skids and Mudflap

During the second film Skids and Mudflap followed Bumblebee's example in taking an onscreen upgrade from something battered and old into shiny General Motors show cars. In the case of the twins they actually shared a vehicle mode when first seen, an old ice cream truck, before upgrading to separate compact cars (a Chevrolet Beat and a Chevrolet Trax). Despite only being onscreen for a few minutes in this form, Hasbro did make a Deluxe class figure based on the ice cream truck. Which is fair enough considering Breakaway got a figure when he got nowhere near the film.

Irritatingly, Hasbro put out the figure with a bare minimum of paint applications and detail work before putting a more thorough version out a matter of months later, bundled with a more screen-accurate Demolishor. It's one of those things that mean I can actually see where toy-swappers come from sometimes.


The ice cream truck mode is actually pretty good in its' own right. It's quite cute and close to the shape and basic colour of the example seen onscreen and is close enough in scale to the Deluxe road cars to work nicely with them. The two-tone white and pink isn't bad in the plastic, even if the pink stuff isn't top quality and would have been better if it was a smoother, glossier type. The mix of transparent plastic and painted windows is maybe something of a regret - the thing's arguably cartoony enough that all-round opaque windows might have worked. The toy is heavy with join lines sadly - in common with several Revenge of the Fallen figures, nothing seems to quite go flush in vehicle mode.

The only real fault is in the presentation. There are some really nice touches of detail, like the engine grille and the natty work on the wheels (grey 'tyres' with painted silver/pink/silver hubs) but in general the vehicle is sparse. While having the full range of adornments seen on screen would perhaps be expensive, the final figure just has too many expanses of plain plastic. The biggest problem though is just that the mode looks too clean and new to really capture the essence of a banged-up old ice cream truck. The slight blandness of the ice cream truck mode can be countered thanks to a Reprolabels upgrade set . This contains a large number of stickers, some taken from the film directly and some simply in keeping with the twins' personalities.


Winningly the truck splits just behind the cab section, allowing easy recreation of the twins' not-so-pivotal role in the Shanghai battle. The front end then forms Skids, with the rear half becoming Mudflap. Skids has a surprisingly complex transformation, though the hardest bit is trying to do everything without the arms popping off. His robot mode is only fractionally bigger than a Legends toy but it's bulkier and generally better developed. It's even more top-heavy and simian than the Beat figure is; the arms are a little too long and the truck wings and plates on the outside of the arms prevent much movement to hide this. Skids is also quite different from the CGI model - onscreen the truck front is facing vertically up, with the windscreen on the robot chest and the bonnet covering the head. Here the cab faces forward, rotated 180° and then tilted forward 90°. It's not so much that it looks bad as it is a shame they couldn't keep closer to it. This might be a churlish criticism though as despite his balance and kibble issues (which negate most of his articulation) he's a well-engineered little robot.

Mudflap has a simpler transformation sequence - the back end is close to the robot squatting down and all that's really required is to stand him up and flip a few pieces into place. He has the better robot mode (in an inversion of the 'upgraded' figures) and is larger and bulkier than his twin - closer to a Scout Class figure (the film cheats outrageously with the CG models while we're here - the twins' robot modes are the same rough size before and after the upgrade, and yet the ice cream truck isn't that much bigger than either of the compacts). Mudflap also has a much more accurate robot mode configuration, though he does get a bit more kibble on his back. Sadly without that grille being dead centre he's mainly made up of bare chunks of pink and white plastic. On the other han, his articulation is much better and the large feet give Mudflap a good sense of balance. Again, he's a nice robot on the whole.


If you like the idiosyncratic design of the heads (which are very accurate to their onscreen appearance and are nicely detailed, scaled-down versions of those seen on the separate Deluxe toys) this is a really nicely done figure. The engineering to get two workable robots out of a van this size is commendable and the robots are fun even if they're less dynamic than others in the line. Overall it's a really fun piece with the alternate mode a refreshing change from the production cars and military hardware elsewhere in the live-action line without being too wilfully quirky. The only real drawback is the lack of detail work but this is addressable in several ways - by getting the Demolishor multi-pack and/or by upgrading with a sticker set from ReproLabels.com, or even if you're a capable kitbasher. In a way that's not the point - it should be Hasbro's job to get stuff like this done on the first pass - but at least they've made a nice base figure to work on.