Transformers Scrapper
Transformers Scrapper
Transformers Scrapper
Transformers Scrapper

This one has a bit of a weird story. The tie-in game for the first Transformers film published by Activision contained a number of specially designed drone robots. Some of these were produced in toy form as part of the movie's extended line - Longarm, Swindle, Payload, Dreadwing and Dropkick. Then two years later the design for the Scrapper unit was updated and released as a Revenge of the Fallen Scout Class figure named Dirt Boss.

Now, Dirt Boss is just one of the meaningless non-specific names Hasbro keep around and arbitrarily slap on figures in lieu of using originality much like Grindor, Camshaft or Swerve. Names that don't mean anything and are just picked out of a hat for random recolours of actual characters. So, I'm calling this guy Scrapper after his game appearance, even if there was a Revenge of the Fallen Constructicon by the same name (who only got a Legends figure - boo!). Bottom line is it's my bloody site and I'll call him whatever I want to call him. So nyah.


The figure's vehicle mode is a forklift truck - it's something nice and unglamorous without being a construction vehicle, therefore still standing out nicely compared to the Constructicons, as well as being a bit different to the GM concept cars and military hardware elsewhere in the line. It would be remiss of me not to point out that Bandai got there in 1984, however. The moulding is nicely detailed, with some good detail sculpting, while the thing's actually of a passable scale to interact with the Deluxe/Voyager Autobot cars.

However, this thing is cheap. It's all moulded from two plastic colours only (seemingly inspired by the Generation 2 Autorollers), meaning the fork apparatus is green with grey forks, the tyres are grey and the cockpit is a mix of the both - including a snot-green steering wheel. There are a couple of flashes of gold paint but the overall impression is closer to a cheap Chinese bootleg than an official figure. It's a real shame as it sucks a lot of the charm out of a rather cute mould. Oh, and the forks don't really move. They can tilt back, but if you put anything on them, they fold down. That's rather poor; even if it was somehow impossible to put a lifting fork on like Bandai did 25 years previous, they could at least be stable. That's this vehicle in a nutshell, though - first glance it's cute, closer inspection reveals it's sloppy.


Like most Scouts the figure has an 'unfolding' transformation, resulting in a robot mode larger than you'd expect from such a compact vehicle mode. The figure is rather spindly and generally free of kibble. The exception is the arms, and it's a bit of a problem. While the idea of the forks becoming blades is a neat one, the rest of the masts (I looked it up!) have to come as well and just hang off Scrapper's wrists, compromising the articulation of the figure. Aside from this, it's a decent design - the cockpit cage over the shoulders is nice and the thing has some surprisingly dynamic legs.

Despite the horrid green still being present the colour scheme works a lot better in this mode too. There are even some paint applications worth bothering with, including gold on the shins, face and chest and even a red dot. A red dot. The head design isn't the best - I'd have much preferred the visor/faceplate one used in the game but then I guess Hasbro's design team are trying to convince you that Dirt Boss is a proper guy with a personality of his own (read: exactly the same as most Decepticons - a bit nasty and vicious, probably mildly stupid at the same time). It doesn't really work, and it might have been preferable if they'd just put their hands up and made the thing a drone. Despite being small Scrapper is probably about the right height to interact with some figures, as the units in the computer game were also quite diminutive. Sadly he doesn't break down into component parts when other robots hit him on the head, though.


The basic figure does have a winning simplicity to it. The transformation is neat and the robot is largely well-balanced. Sadly, the colour scheme is tacky and cheapens the hard work of the design team - lime green and grey? Argh. Cheap and cheerful would be an apt description if it wasn't for Scouts really not being that cheap (around two thirds of a Deluxe) and the mould really doesn't have to look this bad. A wasted opportunity.