Transformers Dropkick
Transformers Dropkick
Transformers Dropkick
Transformers Dropkick

Dropkick is another drone toy inspired by the 2007 Activision game, again designed by the capable Ken Christensen. The figure was released in the All Spark Power series some time after the film's release. In the game Dropkick drones are one of the less irritating types - while they block just about every single type of weaponry, they don't have any weird illogical gimmicks stopping the player from getting in and fighting them, unlike the Longarm or Payload types.

The Deluxe toy followed the game model very closely, although Dropkick featured a head with a faceplate more in line with the Autobot version. An Autobot recolour named Salvage (following the in-game Autobot scheme fairly closely) came after the Decepticon release, but I find it strangely easier to accept non-screen Decepticons as opposed to Autobots, so settled for Dropkick.


Dropkick's alternate mode is a very solid, compact pickup truck. It's nicely done and not a bad looking shape not a million miles away from the design of Generation 2 Motormouth, and nicely contrasting with the fancy Topkick Ironhide is modelled on. The flat section with the spoiler can be lifted out to reveal a typical pickup bed, which even has panel lines sculpted on it - that's a nice touch. Elsewhere the quality is very high - proper wheels, transparent windows and lights - Hasbro really pushed the boat out here.

What's really impressive though is the colour scheme. The truck is mainly silvery grey with a blue top, and manages to stay cool without going too far down the boy racer route. Blue stripes down the side help, but the real clincher is the massive Decepticon symbol. It's so big you can only really see it from above, from most other angles it just looks like some neat silver stripes. There aren't many ways you can make a three-inch faction symbol subtle but they've managed it here and so it's hats off to them.


Having no significant Automorph gimmicks (only the claw on his hand weapon can really be counted) really frees up the engineering team to give Dropkick a marvellous transformation, fitting the live action feel nicely. It's logical and plausible without being long-winded and fiddly, really great work. And the robot looks very sharp when you get there - the vehicle mode kibble is at just the right level, reminding you how you got here without making the toy look clumsy. The way the truck bonnet splits and clips on to form the shoulders is really nicely done - as are the wing-style bed halves behind.

Dropkick is covered with neat details while again the silvery plastic gives the right robotic look. His official transformation has the legs arranged in a more angular fashion, but I prefer him to be a bit lankier. The toy also has exemplary articulation and balance. It's strange that Hasbro have gone to town so much on a drone figure, really - it's not that I outright dislike Swindle or Payload but they showed signs of corner-cutting whereas Dropkick is one of the best Deluxes from the first film line, probably behind only Bumblebee. Not that I'm complaining. The closest thing I can come to for a complaint is that the claw-thing is a bit big and basic-looking and it's a shame it can't be stored on the robot's back or something. It's not like Dropkick doesn't have any weaponry, with a pair of twin-barrelled guns present under each hand.


Dropkick was one of the pleasant surprises of the line for me. He's just done with that little bit more care and imagination than most of the non-film characters in the line, with a surprisingly slick alternate mode, well thought-out transformation and a very cool robot mode. He really doesn't have any significant faults and is highly recommended - especially considering, like most of the game-derived figures, he's cheap and easy to find.