Transformers Devastator
Transformers Devastator
Transformers Devastator
Transformers Devastator
Transformers Devastator
Transformers Overload
Transformers Overload
Transformers Mixmaster
Transformers Mixmaster
Transformers Rampage
Transformers Rampage
Transformers Scavenger
Transformers Scavenger
Transformers Scrapper
Transformers Scrapper
Transformers Long Haul
Transformers Long Haul
Transformers Hightower
Transformers Hightower
 

In one of those Q&As they do that only fanboys take seriously, Hasbro claimed Devastator officially only has seven components, despite this flatly contradicting the evidence of everyone's eyes (and their own Supreme figure). Thus the Legends set consists of Mixmaster, Scavenger, Overload, Scrapper, Hightower, Rampage and Long Haul.

The set includes the only transforming versions of Scrapper and Hightower yet released (and to be honest it's looking unlikely there'll be larger versions now) and the only toy of Overload full-stop. This was a big factor in me buying the thing when I already have the Supreme figure. Argos having the thing on sale for something like £17 (at UK prices, that's the same price as three individual Legends) was also a big factor and surprisingly Hasbro's packaging was rather nice.


As mentioned Overload is only available as a Legends figure. He turns into a large articulated dumper truck - like many of his team-mates a huge vehicle, something put across on the toy by the cabin on the front section. The toy isn't actually articulated as it happens. It's not a bad looking mode at a distance but a closer look reveals but the (solid) dumper section is covered in join lines. Still, points for doing paint applications on all the tyres (even if the ones on the small, fixed wheels look like I did them).

The figure has a simple transformation that fits the basic live action aesthetic - between the long arms, relatively stumpy legs and overhanging hook, there's more than a whiff of Bonecrusher about the robot mode. The robot form wasn't seen in the film but was glimpsed in the comic adaptation - where he had four arms. The two arms Overload does get don't have much definition to them. However the biggest problem with the squat robot is the complete lack of detail, most notably in the paint applications. The wheels and the hip connections break up the legs nicely, but apart from that there's a sliver of yellow paint as a visor on the head and that's it, resulting in a rather barren knockoff like plain red plastic scheme. Shame really, as with proper detail he wouldn't be without charm.


Mixmaster was also available as a Voyager figure, one of the most complex toys in the whole line. The Legends vehicle mode is heavily simplified to the point of losing all the charm the larger cement mixer had. This is where Legends toys are difficult to gauge - on the one hand obviously a cheap figure has to make sacrifices, that's economic sense. But it doesn't make the toy look any better, and Mixmaster is all flat grey plastic except for painted windows and a silver strip (and Decepticon insignia) on the mixing drum.

The robot mode is even worse. It has a fair go at replicating the larger figure's transformation but I'm not sure it was a wise idea. The result is Mixmaster's idiosyncratic arm layout is rendered as a pair of shoulders or upper arms that extend horizontally from about a quarter inch above and behind his head, with the rest of them then hanging down vertically. Ugly and not helped by more flat grey plastic - the head is barely visible. Well, Mixmaster's head - Devastator's head hangs off his arse like the world's stupidest tail. A dreadful figure.


Rampage uses the yellow colour scheme seen on the initial Deluxe figure, the Supreme figure and in the Devastator scenes in the film. It's a pretty ugly mess too - while unlike the Deluxe it can hold together, there's not a lot else going for it. The grey plastic might give the impression of tracks but because of the makeup of the figure these parts are the wrong sort of shape. While he doesn't suffer as badly as some of his team-mates Rampage again lacks detail.

The simple transformation leads to a passable robot that broadly uses Rampage's onscreen 'pogo' layout, with the underside of the caterpillar tracks adding balance. It's a shame they completely ruin the look though. Rampage touches some of the more risible bases of his Deluxe equivalent, such as the lack of a chest and the general failure to implement the design as a toy. His arms especially just look weird - are the tracks now meant to be passing as arms? Or are the inverted halves of the bulldozer blade meant to be doing that? Who knows? Who even cares? Certainly not the designer of this thing. You could argue that Rampage's unorthodox layout couldn't be translated to a Deluxe so what chance does a Legends figure have - but you could also argue that no-one was holding a gun to Hasbro's head and forcing them to make a toy of it.


Scavenger has the same body type as the maybe-a-Constructicon Demolishor and (as with the Supreme version) uses the same colour scheme used on the initial version of his Voyager figure. His vehicle mode is one of the more successful of the set, despite the large wheels barely concealed inside and the studs on the digger arm. The arm can actually move; along with Hightower's jib, one of the only alt modes in the Legends Constructicons to have any movement.

The transformation is a surprisingly logical take on that of the larger figure, with the tracks folding out of the way and big wheels folding down to replace them. It would have been interesting to see this substitution method on a larger toy where there was space to stow the unnecessary parts in either mode. As it is Scavenger is still rather a sweet-looking toy, and being the only one to have three rather than two colours of any significant quantity helps. He also balances a lot more easily than his Voyager counterpart, even if articulation is more limited. Something of a success, this one.


Scrapper was seen in robot mode in the film, if not for very long, but this Legends toy was the only transforming one made. Which is a bit of a shame - the CG model was rather good and surely he was more worthy of a proper toy than desperate jobs like Stratosphere or Mindwipe. Even a Scout Class would have done. As it is, we're left with only a small frontloader. It's a bit odd-looking actually, with obvious robot limbs along the side failing to blend into the design of the digger itself. However, the larger cabin and black paint apps help distract from the yellow on this occasion.

Transforming Scrapper is fairly simple, possibly the most straightforward of the set. In fact, if you had to sum Scrapper up in one word it would be 'conventional' - together with Long Haul, he stands out along the Constructicons for just having a normal layout and set of proportions. This isn't to be confused with him being boring however - the robot design has a bit of personality to it, and the scant paint applications are actually arranged pretty nicely. The figure also has excellent articulation, especially with the ball-jointed ankles giving him remarkable stability. Really the only bad point about Scrapper is that he offers a tantalising glimpse of a larger figure which sadly never came. Despite some mild reservations about the vehicle mode he's the only member of this set that really stands up as a decent individual figure.


Long Haul was also released as a Voyager figure, this larger version being one of my favourite figures from the Revenge of the Fallen line. The smaller version is a little harder to get excited about by comparison, truth be told. This might be as much because he's less exotic and 'new' than the likes of Overload, Scrapper and Hightower but doesn't stick out by being as dodgy as Mixmaster and Rampage. The vehicle mode retains the same amiable chunkiness of the Voyager, but also shows how important the detail on the larger example was in breaking up all that green.

Without wanting to just bang on about the Voyager, its' status as the only Revenge of the Fallen Constructicon to be an unqualified success puts a lot of pressure on the Legends version. Really the blocky design (smooth out some of the jagged lines and push the head up above the shoulders and Long Haul would look at home in the original series) should be simple for the designers, but they make an arse out of it. Relocating the kibble from the back to the arms makes the robot look downright odd, though the black present does do a good job of breaking the figure up. That the arms can only arc through ninety degrees doesn't help either. That aside (and while articulation isn't everything, you'd expect a figure made in 2009 to be able to match what was standard thirty years ago) Long Haul has little wrong with him. He's just a bit of a disappointment when he should really have been one of the highlights of the set.


Hightower has the most muddy story of all, which is an achievement in itself. The character was announced as having no robot mode, but one was apparently specially created for the Legends figure (the only other toy of Hightower is the non-transforming version made for the Supreme Devastator) although it owes a lot to some of the concept art. The vehicle mode is a crane truck, and (as with Scavenger) the more even balance in colours works wonders. Hightower is also similar to Scavenger in having something approaching a working construction device - the little hook can move, and even hold very tiny light things like pins. It can also be flipped up to allow a nasty (if disguise-blowing) grabber-like implement to take its' place.

Forget Demolishor, forget Arcee, forget Rampage, forget Scalpel. In short, forget any premature declarations I've made. This is the weirdest robot mode from the line. A surprisingly clever transformation reveals Hightower to be a backwards crane with caterpillar tracks as legs, a prone main body and little rodent-like arms hanging off his chin. And yet... it's not actually bad. Articulation is limited to being able to swing either the hook or the grabber up onto the top of the converted crane rig as a scorpion-esque weapon or hinging the cage around the face up so the illusion with the arms is ruined, but there's something breathtakingly unique about the design. It's like someone said "Hey, people are going to buy the set anyway, let's really go mad on one". It's a shame that the toy's far too bizarre for a larger version to be commercially sensible, as seeing this thing in Voyager size with the ideas fully implemented would be fascinating.


Putting the Constructicons together is fun and satisfying and results in a combined form around the size of a Deluxe figure. The Legends version is less segmented than its' Supreme counterpart, and the way Scavenger and Overload fit together is nicely done. It's a shame then that Devastator doesn't look good. In the film he's rather shambling, but here he's downright clumsy-looking. There's a weird hunchbacked look to him, with the head hanging off the front of the body like one of those flower baskets you get outside pubs. Quite why the back had to be built up so high I don't know as it means the head basically has to come down that low to stop the shoulders looking bad.

It's like the torso is following the crawling gait seen onscreen, but the limbs are trying to use the standing position the Supreme generally takes. The arms don't look good either - utilising the upper arms of Scavenger is a bad halfway house and gives the impression of Devastator having a pair of tiny stumpy arms with two construction vehicles stuck on the ends. Articulation is poor as well - while both the arms and the legs can rotate on their posts, the only meaningful movement is in the shoulders and elbows provided by Scavenger. However this only serves to show off the ramshackle nature of the thing. It really is an ugly, inarticulate thing.


The Legends version of Devastator is interesting, but hardly successful. Of the individual figures, only Scavenger and Scrapper really come off - although Hightower has a mad sort of charm to him. Some good engineering and the figure's small size mean combining him remains diverting, but he looks awful as Devastator. Is this one better than the Supreme? Probably, for what it is - both are flawed, but this one's cheaper and has a wider range of features. It's still some way short of being particularly good, though.