DEEP SEA DIVER  
  Code Name: DEEP SIX  
 

Included with the 1984 SHARC flying submarine, Deep Six was possibly the weirdest figure in the whole original run. He was one of the few 'Generation 1' figures to depart from the basic O-ring layout, and certainly the most radical, being mainly a solid diving suit with movement at the shoulders only. The character appeared in both the cartoon and comic as a sort of weird Rain Man type with no social skills, though his humourless personality in the latter might be put down to none of Larry Hama’s incessant jokes being particularly funny.

Subsequent versions of Deep Six freed him from his diving suit prison, though as these involved things like pink flippers and luminous green helmets, he probably wasn’t much better off. Come 2008 and the 25th Anniversary reissue of the SHARC, he was back in the thing, now helped by boffo-socko super-articulation. Or rather, he isn’t. Deep Six does have five extra points of articulation – the elbows, wrists and neck – but is still basically a big block with a head on it. The dome of his diving suit can pop off too. But that’s it, he’s still basically a block with arms.

Now, I’m about to shamelessly flaunt my ignorance about diving suits, but it’s a shame they couldn’t do something with the legs so he’s a bit more mobile. I mean, for all I know this sort of suit doesn’t have moving legs, but then real army units don’t have chaps in football shirts or flamethrower troopers who aren’t allowed to set people on fire, so there we go. It’d be nice if he could do a bit more than stand there and wave a bit. I mean, it’s practical and all, and he pilots the SHARC well enough, but in just about any sort of display or play that doesn’t involve Deep Six being about to dive for treasure or a crashed Sky Striker which has Mainframe’s really important computer that’s got vital information to save the world from Cobra inside it he’s completely redundant.

Deep Six also keeps his weird air bellows gimmick, as on the original. This thing pops onto his back and can fill him with air so he floats in water, see. Which, when you think about it, is just about the last thing a guy in a diving suit should be doing. He’s either on land standing waving at people in the hope they’ll pick him up and carry him to the canteen for a Hamaburger and Milksnake, or a hundred yards underwater. So yeh, Deep Six is basically a prop. A very nicely done one with lots of lovely detailing, totally faithful to the original, but difficult to get excited about.

G.I. Joe Deep Six
G.I. Joe Deep Six
G.I. Joe Deep Six
G.I. Joe Deep Six